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Readers Respond: Do You Write Accessible HTML? Why or Why Not?

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Writing accessible HTML isn't much more difficult than writing inaccessible HTML, but many people choose not to worry about whether their pages are accessible or not. Find out what other Web designers think about writing accessible HTML and share your own reasons for doing so (or not).

If you're not, you're working too hard.

Doing modern semantic, accessible sites with clean HTML and CSS will give you a nice bump in the search-engine rankings, and will load faster for a wide variety of clients. Both of those attributes are things I see people put way too much work in for nearly-ready-to-roll-out sites. Moral: As with most fields, doing things right the first time is far easier than slapping planeloads of Band-Aids on later.
—jeff_dickey

About true accessibility

It's more than just providing alt tags, navigation, etc. To be truly accessible, you need to think about people with low vision who aren't using a screen reader - use high contrast, larger fonts, more whitespace, etc. - and also those with physical disabilities. I have built sites specifically geared for accessibility, but otherwise I just do the basics, such as using alt tags, lists rather than images for navigation, and no tables. I do think fully accessible design is somewhat limiting, so I don't use it unless it's really necessary for the client's mission and/or the website's intended audience.
—Guest Webnicki

Yes to Accessibility!

Yes, I want to make accessible sites! There are no longer valid reasons (but still plenty of excuses) as to why accessibility is often still near the bottom of the priority list. Accessibility benefits everybody by being inclusive. A more personal reason to build accessible sites is to ensure they are complete. If I leave out important elements of a website, such as accessibility, I am shortchanging the client, the web design community, the community at large, and myself for doing only a half-baked job.
—Guest Krikket

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